Creating an Anticipatory Set

When something bad is about to happen, people will get tense.  When beginning a competition, people will become focused.  When preparing for a happy occasion, people will become relaxed.  They anticipate what the event will entail and set their own expectations and body language in preparation.

Effective teachers know this, and they will prepare their students by getting them ready to learn.  They call it the “anticipatory set.”  It makes learning more effective for the students, and easier for the themselves.

Leaders and managers can do the same thing, by creating conditions in which their people perform at higher than normal levels, depending on what the challenge is.  From high-stress to low-stress situations, an anticipatory set improves outcomes.

What is the anticipatory set that you create for your weekly staff meetings, your one-on-ones, and other key interactions?

Powerful Ideas to Improve Your Leadership

From many years of coaching executives, here are five pointers for becoming a better leader:IMG_4487

  1. Hire people who are better than you in their discipline; not subordinates.
  2. Focus yourself on key priorities — move a few things forward a mile rather than a lot of things forward an inch.
  3. Focus your people on results; not activities.
  4. Demand commitment; not compliance.
  5. Encourage and reward open, honest, and insightful thinking; not going with the flow.
  6. Expect people to fail now and then. Mistakes are part of learning.

© Copyright 2017  Bob Legge

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Bob Legge provides organizations with the ability to exceed their most ambitious goals.  I work with leaders of Fortune 500 companies, small and mid-size companies, nonprofits, education, and government. Together, we drive strategy, lead successful change, develop high performance cultures, improve individual and organizational performance, and produce faster, sustainable growth and value.  Contact him at  bob.legge@leggecompany.com

The Big Disconnect

Here it is:  Most people have above average reviews, but the company is under-performing.

Sure, it could be the case that everyone is working hard, and the company results aren’t there.  But then, what are you basing performance on?  Effort?  If so, consider evaluating for results (and behaviors that support the your company values.)  You need to align everyone’s objectives with the company results you want for the year.  That way, you won’t have good reviews and miss your company targets.

This is not a particularly easy thing to accomplish because it depends on rigor, accountability, planning, and above all, responsibility.  But it’s the way to get everyone on the same page and pulling in the same direction to achieve the results you need.

Do you have the alignment you need through this year?

© Copyright 2017  Bob Legge

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Bob Legge provides organizations with the ability to exceed their most ambitious goals.  I work with leaders of Fortune 500 companies, small and mid-size companies, nonprofits, education, and government. Together, we drive strategy, lead successful change, develop high performance cultures, improve individual and organizational performance, and produce faster, sustainable growth and value.  Contact him at  bob.legge@leggecompany.com

 

Do This Before the End of February

It’s February and you’ve got most of the year still ahead.   See if you can answer these questions clearly and briefly:

  1. What is your strategy?
  2. What is the over-arching vision you have for your company?
  3. What is the major theme, or themes, you want your people to run hard at this year?
  4. What are your top three priorities for the company?

Your people want to know how to move forward, what to base their day-to-day decisions on, and how to know they are on-track.  If you’ve put together a simple roadmap or strategy, it will be found posted in their work areas, cubicles and offices.  More complex strategies are in PowerPoint presentations or binders and they rarely get looked at.  So if you can answer the four questions above, make sure your people know the answers too.  If you can’t answer them, you need to get to work.  As I said, most of the year is still ahead.

© Copyright 2017  Bob Legge

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Bob Legge provides organizations with the ability to exceed their most ambitious goals.  I work with leaders of Fortune 500 companies, small and mid-size companies, nonprofits, education, and government. Together, we drive strategy, lead successful change, develop high performance cultures, improve individual and organizational performance, and produce faster, sustainable growth and value.  Contact him at  bob.legge@leggecompany.com

Three Imperatives of Profitable Growth

From over 30 years of working with organizations of all sizes and in many industries on improving business outcomes especially growth and profits:

  1. The most valuable part is having a plan that focuses on both distinctive strategy and operational excellence.
  2. The hardest part is sticking to the plan by following-up on performance commitments including position accountabilities, projects, and key operating measures.
  3. The chief downfall is not aligning the organization with plan. Successful companies have one plan with everyone understanding their role in getting results.  Also-rans may have a plan, but they let organizational functions and departments do their own thing.

© Copyright 2017  Bob Legge

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Bob Legge provides organizations with the ability to exceed their most ambitious goals.  I work with leaders of Fortune 500 companies, small and mid-size companies, nonprofits, education, and government. Together, we drive strategy, lead successful change, develop high performance cultures, improve individual and organizational performance, and produce faster, sustainable growth and value.  Contact him at  bob.legge@leggecompany.com

Beware Organizational Arsonists

An arsonist is someone who finds little things to pick on, to call attention to, and to question.  They start small  “fires” here and there requiring time and attention to put them out.  The fires they start are not part of continuous improvement, they are distractions and they divert resources away from the strategy and the important and urgent tasks.  Some organizations even appoint fire fighters to put out the fires caused by the arsonists.  You don’t need arsonists or fire fighters.

What’s Your Point?

Many people tell me that they like my On the Same Page emails because they are brief, to-the-point, and practical.  I try to do the same thing when I speak.  Because I learned some time ago that the very best leaders I’ve worked with don’t need a lot of words — they express their thoughts effectively and confidently by being terse.  In comparison, I see people in meetings get long-winded, going off on tangents, telling stories, or even repeating what they say.

I’ve found that the longer one talks, the less they actually communicate.   That’s either because their message gets lost in all the words, or they don’t really know what their message is.

When you’re clear about your message, you are able to say it briefly.  Work on this for yourself and for your team.  It will help make meetings shorter and more effective.  A tip:  Ask, “What’s your point?”

© Copyright 2016  Bob Legge

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Bob Legge provides organizations with the ability to exceed their most ambitious goals.  I work with leaders of Fortune 500 companies, small and mid-size companies, nonprofits, education, and government. Together, we drive strategy, lead successful change, develop high performance cultures, improve individual and organizational performance, and produce faster, sustainable growth and value.  Contact him at  bob.legge@leggecompany.com