Strategic Position — Knowing Where You Are When Navigating Corporate Strategy

A key to business strategy implementation is navigation. Knowing where you are, how far you have traveled, and how much further you must go. On a sailboat, there are many instruments and tools to navigate one’s course. The same is true in business. But you cannot depend solely on one way to do the navigation. In sailing, relying on only GPS, for example, can put you in great danger if the GPS unit stops working. In this video, Bob compares navigation in sailing and navigation for strategy implementation.

See all eight segments at my YouTube Channel:  http://bit.ly/1mGfyUY

Bob Legge works with companies to improve individual and organizational performance. His clients have included Fortune 500 companies, mid-size companies, non-profits, education and government. To find out more, contact Bob at boblegge@boblegge.com or call him at (585) 305-7853. Bob’s website is www.boblegge.com.

Why have performance reviews?

Recently, there’s been a lot written about how bad performance reviews are.  I agree.  In fact, the traditional performance review is perfectly designed to deflate employees, depress managers, and provide no meaningful improvement to either performance or development.  But if you think people don’t like performance reviews, try not having them–people won’t like that either.

The key is to refocus on the purpose of performance reviews (and it’s not to determine how to dole out the merit increase budget, which is a big part of the problem.)  A hint:  If your performance review process isn’t resulting in better performance and better alignment with your business strategy, you should get rid of it and start from scratch.  And if you want ideas on how to do it, send me an email (bob.legge[at]leggecompany.com) and I’ll send you my article on how to do it.

 

When to Change Your Strategy — Navigating Corporate Strategy

When implementing a strategy, it is imperative to adapt to conditions.  In most cases, this means not following the plan, but improvising to adjust to market conditions, competitive moves, customer changes, vendor problems, technological change, and other key influences.  This is to be expected as noted by all primary strategic thinkers from Von Clauswitz to Peter Drucker to Steve Jobs.  How you go about making adaptations calls for good leadership and communications.  Not surprisingly, the same need for adaptation to plan is required in sailing.  Wind shifts, waves, storms, trafffic, damaged equipment, and other changing conditions require the ability to note the change early and adapt quickly.  In this video, Bob compares the need to adjust plans in both business and in sailing.

See all eight segments at my YouTube Channel:  http://bit.ly/1mGfyUY

Bob Legge works with companies to improve individual and organizational performance. His clients have included Fortune 500 companies, mid-size companies, non-profits, education and government. To find out more, contact Bob at boblegge@boblegge.com or call him at (585) 305-7853. Bob’s website is www.boblegge.com.

Why managers need to get beyond criticism

I believe that criticism is one of the lowest level skills–because anyone can do it.  And criticism has little value for a supervisor or manager whose job it is to improve the performance and value of subordinates.  The fact that performance reviews are often built around criticism is a clear sign that the manager’s skills are in need of improvement.  People who have a performance difficulty need help to identify and correct the cause of weak performance.  It can be a skill deficiency, a process problem, a lack of motivation, whatever.  In any case, what’s needed is a system for coaching not criticism.

Determining Your Strategy — Navigating Corporate Strategy

In business strategy, determining your strategy is setting the course to achieve the vision and strategic objectives.  After setting your mission and vision, you need to determine the strategy to get there, and the best approach is to begin with the vision and work backwards.  The biggest mistake in strategy is to compete head-to-head with your competitors. Better is to identify what makes you unique. The second biggest mistake is to extrapolate forward beginning with where you are, instead of beginning with where you want to be and working backwards.  Bob makes the comparison to sailing where knowing the destination, then working backwards from there helps find the best route and avoid hazards.

See all eight segments at my YouTube Channel:  http://bit.ly/1mGfyUY

Bob Legge works with companies to improve individual and organizational performance. His clients have included Fortune 500 companies, mid-size companies, non-profits, education and government. To find out more, contact Bob at boblegge@boblegge.com or call him at (585) 305-7853. Bob’s website is www.boblegge.com.

For a Better Organization, Replace Your “Check Engine” Light

In healthy organizations, there is openness, trust, and a focus on achieving shared outcomes. There is no need for anonymity in 360-degree feedback or employee surveys because everyone is concerned more about making improvements and progress than on who said what. It is the complete opposite in unhealthy organizations where people are afraid to give feedback. I saw this first-hand in one organization where an autocratic CEO decided to do an open feedback session for the first time with his senior team. Despite assurances about it being purely constructive and positive, those few executives who provided real feedback to the CEO, found themselves on the outs. All were gone within three years.
All organizations have a need to identify ways to improve. Unhealthy companies have the equivalent of a “Check Engine” light – management knows something is wrong, they just don’t know what (although it’s often perfectly obvious to everyone below the management level.) In contrast healthy companies get early warnings of specific concerns and are able to immediately address them.

Navigating Corporate Strategy: Start Your Strategy at the End

Business strategy begins with mission and vision–the destination. The strategy, and how you implement it, depend on knowing where you are going and what you want to accomplish. A very clear idea of what the organization will be in the future including such items as market position, competitive advantage, competencies, size, and key talent required are important. The best companies create a vivid vision. The also-rans settle for a vague one-sentence vision that says they’ll be the best in their industry, but provides no clarity on what that means. Being clear on the destination, whether in business or in sailing is a key element of strategy. This video compares setting a destination in both business strategy and in sailing strategy.

See all eight segments of Navigating Corporate Strategy at my YouTube Channel:  http://bit.ly/1mGfyUY

Bob Legge works with companies to improve individual and organizational performance. His clients have included Fortune 500 companies, mid-size companies, non-profits, education and government. To find out more, contact Bob at boblegge@boblegge.com or call him at (585) 305-7853. Bob’s website is www.boblegge.com.