How to develop objective leadership in a subjective world

We live in a world that is populated by factions and special interests.  By focusing on one side, Fox News has become highly successful, so much so that it didn’t take long for MSNBC to take the same approach, but from a different point of view.   The New York Times editorial flavor is strongly tilted one way, and the Wall Street Journal’s editorial flavor goes the other way. People gravitate to information sources that reflect their values and beliefs, and in doing so, their beliefs are reinforced, and their emotions are stoked, but they never get a truly objective view.

This can happen within organizations too.  Different functions see situations through different lenses so that marketing and manufacturing and customer service may all have very different interpretations and recommendations–all based on incomplete knowledge.

The role of the leader is to listen without prejudice and to come to an objective understanding without being swayed by limited views or emotion.  That’s not easy.  It’s a judgment skill, and it needs to be learned early on, in one’s first supervisory or management role.

What are you doing in your organization to develop your managers and leaders early on?

© Bob Legge 2014  All rights reserved

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Making Your Strategy Work – Free Download of my article on what it takes to turn a strategy into successful implementation and achieve key objectives.  Click here:  http://bit.ly/O8syFd

 

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Get Your Senior Team on the Same Page

You must have all your senior on-the-same-page or your strategy implementation will be weak. Here’s how to make that happen.

See all my videos at my YouTube Channel:  http://bit.ly/1mGfyUY

Bob Legge works with companies to improve individual and organizational performance. His clients have included Fortune 500 companies, mid-size companies, non-profits, education and government. To find out more, contact Bob at boblegge@boblegge.com or call him at (585) 305-7853. Bob’s website is www.boblegge.com.

Need a faster organization? Think internet, not machine.

The internet and the speed of business is changing how companies manage functions and people. the idea that an organization is like a machine where the parts can be optimized and monitored separately creates competing silos and is simply not fast enough in today’s world.

For example, a consumer products company I know must streamline their new product development process to get more products out, faster. Defining steps and roles for every action looked good on paper, but has bogged-down the entire process.

Contrast that with two other organizations I’m familiar with: A national research lab and a Shanghai-based architecture team. Each one is able to achieve much higher performance by working as somewhat loose teams having a clear goal, but where individuals make decisions on-the-fly. Instead of the machine model, it’s the kind of distributed processing typified by the internet.

How fast is your organization?

What is Strategy Implementation?

Most strategies fail to achieve their objectives. The problem is rarely the strategy and usually a weak implementation. Successful implementation requires far more than an action plan, t-shirts, and coffee mugs. Here’s what it takes to successfully launch a strategy.

See all my videos at my YouTube Channel:  http://bit.ly/1mGfyUY

Bob Legge works with companies to improve individual and organizational performance. His clients have included Fortune 500 companies, mid-size companies, non-profits, education and government. To find out more, contact Bob at boblegge@boblegge.com or call him at (585) 305-7853. Bob’s website is www.boblegge.com.

Are you too busy for strategy?

I’m finding that executives in most companies are running flat-out these days.  Many of the companies who contact me say their executives simply don’t have the time to do strategy, improve key processes, or sharpen organization alignment–and it shows.  In fact, that’s one reason they want to engage with me.  But you cannot effectively manage an enterprise with your head in the details because you won’t be able to see the big picture and cannot make progress on the things that really matter.
A good strategy does not over-load the organization with tasks, particularly today when organizations are running lean.  Instead, a good strategy forces you to make decisions about what you are going to do, and equally important, what you’re not going to do.  You and your organization will be far more successful if you move a few things forward a mile instead of trying to move a lot of things forward a foot.  If your team doesn’t have time for strategy, it’s a sure sign that you’re not on top of your game.

Leading Change & Keeping Everyone On-Board — Navigating Corporate Change

In business strategy, navigating change is of paramount importance. Every strategic plan requires changes in how the organization must perform, and no strategy is implemented without further change along the way. It is imperative then that the leader be able to anticipate and lead change whenever it is appropriate. In this video, Bob compares the regular changes required for a sailboat to make progress, and how the skipper leads those changes to alert the crew of upcoming change and then decisively take the action needed to successfully make the change happen.

See all eight segments at my YouTube Channel:  http://bit.ly/1mGfyUY

Bob Legge works with companies to improve individual and organizational performance. His clients have included Fortune 500 companies, mid-size companies, non-profits, education and government. To find out more, contact Bob at boblegge@boblegge.com or call him at (585) 305-7853. Bob’s website is www.boblegge.com.