From Micromanager to Effective Leader

When people are micro-managed, they become self-conscious, intimidated, mistake avoiding, and fearful.  They wait for orders, subdue their creativity, and rarely make suggestions.  That’s not the kind of people you need — you want people who are self-confident, continually learning, taking action without waiting to be told, and coming up with ideas to improve operations, customer service, and themselves.

To change the tendency to micromanage you have to adopt a new mindset and new skills.  For example:

  • You must believe that your role is more strategic and less tactical. You need to lead your organization and build the capability among your people to handle tactical issues.
  • Set-up accountabilities and metrics so that people know the results that are expected of them and can measure and adjust their own performance.
  • Learn how to effectively listen. This is one of the least understood and least practiced skills in management today.
  • Get good at coaching people to handle problems and make improvements — not taking over the work and doing it yourself.

*******

Bob Legge provides organizations with the ability to exceed their most ambitious goals.  I work with leaders of Fortune 500 companies, mid-size companies, nonprofits, education, and government. Together, we drive strategy, lead successful change, develop high performance cultures, improve individual and organizational performance, and produce faster, sustainable growth and value.  Contact him at  bob.legge@leggecompany.com

Support Your People

I’ve seen managers and executives who seem to be obsessed with looking for what their people are doing wrong or mistakes they’ve made.  And I’ve seen some play one-ups-manship and “gotcha” games.

But you are on the same team, right?  They’re an extension of you, correct?

So help them be successful by encouraging, supporting, guiding, challenging, and stimulating them to be better performers.  Develop their skills and abilities and make them more valuable to you and your organization.  Build trusting relationships with common goals and candid talk.  Give credit for accomplishments and treat people with dignity.

Why on Earth would you do it differently?

*******

Bob Legge provides organizations with the ability to exceed their most ambitious goals.  I work with leaders of Fortune 500 companies, mid-size companies, nonprofits, education, and government. Together, we drive strategy, lead successful change, develop high performance cultures, improve individual and organizational performance, and produce faster, sustainable growth and value.  Contact him at  bob.legge@leggecompany.com

Restructuring? More Ideas for Success

Last week I wrote about key elements of restructuring.  Here are a few more practical tips from my years of working with scores of organizations going through change:

  • Your strategy is (hopefully) unique.  That means your organization design also needs to be unique, so don’t go trying to copy what others have done.
  • How people interact makes a huge difference — even in the digital age — so pay attention to proximity and interaction.
  • Processes drive value, so a redesign needs to enable the few processes that drive most of that value.

Finally, make sure that your organization redesign avoids both gaps and overlaps in accountability.

Bob Legge provides organizations with the ability to exceed their most ambitious goals.  I work with leaders of Fortune 500 companies, mid-size companies, nonprofits, education, and government. Together, we drive strategy, lead successful change, develop high performance cultures, improve individual and organizational performance, and produce faster, sustainable growth and value.  Contact him at  bob.legge@leggecompany.com

Practical Tips for Successful Organization Restructuring

Practical Tips for Successful Organization Restructuring
If you’re doing an acquisition, merging, wanting to be more market or customer-focused, or restructuring to cut costs, the last thing you want to do is shuffle boxes and lines.  I learned early in my career, and it’s been borne out over the years working with organizations ranging from start-ups to Fortune 100 companies, that with redesigns, there are three enormous traps:

  1. Relying on gut instinct to do the redesign
  2. Letting politics drive redesign decisions
  3. Seeing only lines, boxes and reporting relationships as what is important.

Instead, make sure that you understand the current organization’s strengths and the cause of any limitations.  Have specific design criteria based  on your longer-term strategy — not on fixing current problems.  And be sure to consider the impact of people, accountability, and culture, on how the redesign will work.

~~~~~

Bob Legge provides organizations with the ability to exceed their most ambitious goals.  I work with leaders of Fortune 500 companies, mid-size companies, nonprofits, education, and government. Together, we drive strategy, lead successful change, develop high performance cultures, improve individual and organizational performance, and produce faster, sustainable growth and value.  Contact him at  bob.legge@leggecompany.com