Improving the Value of Your Workforce — One Person at a Time

As a leader or manager, one of your tasks is to continually increase the value of your workforce.  Usually this means training and developing groups.  But you should also be thinking about individuals, particularly:

  • Separating those who do not or cannot perform to standards
  • Separating those who do not or cannot behave in-line with the corporate values
  • Selecting and hiring those who do fit the culture and will likely be high performers.

Each and every improvement increases the overall value of your workforce.

© Copyright 2016  Bob Legge

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Bob Legge provides organizations with the ability to exceed their most ambitious goals.  I work with leaders of Fortune 500 companies, small and mid-size companies, nonprofits, education, and government. Together, we drive strategy, lead successful change, develop high performance cultures, improve individual and organizational performance, and produce faster, sustainable growth and value.  Contact him at  bob.legge@leggecompany.com

When Poor Performance is Caused by the Boss

When analyzing a performance problem, I’ve found it often pays to look at the supervisor or manager and how they manage their people.  Examples:

  • Micromanaging
  • Unclear or no accountabilities
  • Weak communications
  • A lack of performance standards
  • Ineffective or no key processes
  • No performance reviews
  • No performance plans
  • Not addressing performance problems
  • Not addressing development needs
  • Gaps or overlaps in accountability
  • Consistently hiring the wrong people, and so on.

In fact, it’s astounding how often it’s the boss who is enabling performance problems, and with some help, he or she can significantly improve the performance of an individual, a department, a division, or even a company.  Many  times the boss is not aware that this is happening and is very receptive to guidance or coaching.

Do you have supervisors or managers who can be more effective?  What are you doing to help them?

© Copyright 2016  Bob Legge

~~~~~

Bob Legge provides organizations with the ability to exceed their most ambitious goals.  I work with leaders of Fortune 500 companies, small and mid-size companies, nonprofits, education, and government. Together, we drive strategy, lead successful change, develop high performance cultures, improve individual and organizational performance, and produce faster, sustainable growth and value.  Contact him at  bob.legge@leggecompany.com

How leaders’ behaviors affect their people

Someone (I think it was Woody Allen) said that the role of the leader is to demonstrate how to act to his/her people.  It’s sound advice.  The most admired leaders show a focus and determination on achieving goals, getting things done, welcoming ideas, generating enthusiasm, using data and evidence to make decisions, being compassionate with people concerns, valuing honesty, and so on.  I’ve worked with hundreds of leaders and thousands of managers each of whom had their own way of positively influencing their organizations through their actions.

I’m concerned that our national leaders and candidates often demonstrate deleterious and lamentable behaviors that negatively affect the nation.  Make no mistake:  People do take their cues from their leaders.

My advice to leaders is this:   Your people watch your actions and behaviors and use them to legitimize their own behaviors.  If you want them to be honest, positive, innovative, engaging, and productive then be that way yourself.