The First Key to Exponential Growth

If you want exponential growth, you need to have a very clear picture of the business you want to have in the future: What will you be providing? Who will be the customers? How big will the company be? What will be your role? It’s called ‘having a vision.’ It’s not enough to be obsessed with more revenue, fewer problems and more profits. That’s being stuck in the day-to-day. You must think bigger.

Some leaders don’t have such a vision, and that’s a problem. But it’s nearly as bad when the leader does have a vision, but only shares it with key people and the vision never gets communicated to people who sell to customers, make the products, deliver the services, and make things happen on the frontline. If they don’t know where you want to take your company, how can they help make it happen?

If you want growth, you must have a vision, and you also do three other things: First, articulate it simply. Second, communicate throughout your organization as well as to your board, investors, customers, vendors, and any other key stakeholders. Get everyone on the same page. Third, reinforce it with rewards for your people.

This is not as easy as it may sound, particularly for your own business. It can be extremely helpful to have an advisor who can work with you to develop the vision and make it simple and effective.

How clearly have you developed and communicated your vision?

Copyright 2017 Bob Legge
___________________________
Bob Legge has an unmatched ability to help clients achieve competitive advantage, leaving competitors in their dust. He has worked with companies across industries and geographies to align critical elements, dominate their markets, and achieve dramatic results, such as 600% revenue increase in three years. Personally, he enjoys sailing where both his strategic abilities and tactical skills help him see interesting places while having a fabulous time with friends and family.
Contact him at: bob.legge@leggecompany.com.

 

Harassment: What CEOs can do about it

The long-time Weinstein abuse and harassment was both widespread and known in the entertainment industry and beyond. It was an “open secret” that at least one major media outlet knew about, but didn’t report on, and it existed in an industry that is outspoken in its support of individual rights.

What kept the lid on was power. The power to end careers, end deals, and end financial contributions.

Power can keep the lid on within organizations too. A person with the power to fire, demote, destroy a career or a reputation can effectively keep the lid on abuse that is both well-known within the organization, but contained. I once worked with a very large organization where both the chief executive and the board had no idea that a senior executive’s abusive behavior was widespread, but no one wanted to tell the CEO for fear for their jobs, and a concern that the situation wouldn’t be adequately addressed.

These situations can quickly destroy an organization’s culture and create a major problem for senior management.

The solution: Chief executives and boards need to have two elements in place: A mechanism to alert them to these kinds of situations, and an impeccable process to address these situations when they surface. There are several effective ways to do both.

What are you doing about this?

Copyright 2017 Bob Legge
___________________________
Bob Legge has an unmatched ability to help clients achieve competitive advantage, leaving competitors in their dust. He has worked with companies across industries and geographies to align critical elements, dominate their markets, and achieve dramatic results, such as 600% revenue increase in three years. Personally, he enjoys sailing where both his strategic abilities and tactical skills help him see interesting places while having a fabulous time with friends and family.
Contact him at: bob.legge@leggecompany.com.

3 Key Elements of Teamwork

One of the most important factors in achieving high performance is teamwork. That’s true for two reasons: First, because organizations exist because their overall mission and goals require more than one person and those people must coordinate their efforts and collaborate. Second, because well-functioning teams always out-perform collections of individuals.

I am often retained by senior leaders to improve overall company performance. It is nearly always the case that weak teamwork is one cause of underperformance.
Effective teams require good leadership, capable team members and a plan to orchestrate their individual and team performance.

How would you rate your teamwork? What could use strengthening?

Copyright 2017 Bob Legge
___________________________
Bob Legge has an unmatched ability to help clients achieve competitive advantage, leaving competitors in their dust. He has worked with companies across industries and geographies to align critical elements, dominate their markets, and achieve dramatic results, such as 600% revenue increase in three years. Personally, he enjoys sailing where both his strategic abilities and tactical skills help him see interesting places while having a fabulous time with friends and family.
Contact him at: bob.legge@leggecompany.com.

 

What leaders can learn from Wells Fargo, Uber, and Weinstein

Corporate culture is in the news due to the likes of Wells Fargo, Uber, and the Harvey Weinstein Company. CEOs, through their own behavior, set the values and the standards of an organization. It generally matters very little what the CEO says in speeches or what values are posted in the lobby. What really matters is how the CEO acts, and how senior managers act.

Here’s a rule of thumb: If you want to understand the values of an organization, look at what it takes to get promoted.

Corporate culture is real. It has a powerful affect on people. You need to be concerned about how your corporate culture informs your employees’ behavior. A strong culture can be a source of competitive advantage. A weak culture usually causes problems.

What are you doing to build and reinforce a strong, positive culture in your business?

Copyright 2017 Bob Legge
___________________________
Bob Legge has an unmatched ability to help clients achieve competitive advantage, leaving competitors in their dust. He has worked with companies across industries and geographies to align critical elements, dominate their markets, and achieve dramatic results, such as 600% revenue increase in three years. Personally, he enjoys sailing where both his strategic abilities and tactical skills help him see interesting places while having a fabulous time with friends and family.
Contact him at: bob.legge@leggecompany.com.

Is Your Strategy Sustainable?

Business strategy is all about having a distinctive position in your market, and making that distinctiveness sustainable.

A distinctiveness that can be easily replicated is not a good strategy. Companies build sustainable strategies by bundling organizational competencies around their distinctiveness. K-Mart tried hard to copy what WalMart does and several airlines have tried and failed to replicate Southwest Airlines’ success. It’s not that the strategies are difficult, but implementing and executing those strategies requires alignment of organizational capabilities, people skills, culture, workflows and the way they manage people and use technology.

In short, a sustainable strategy is reflected in the entire way the company does business, not just product or service offerings. A key competitive advantage is how well a company performs as a whole – and that can be exceedingly difficult to copy, and very profitable.

How are you making your strategy and its execution sustainable and difficult to replicate?

Copyright 2017 Bob Legge
___________________________
Bob Legge has an unmatched ability to help clients achieve competitive advantage, leaving competitors in their dust. He has worked with companies across industries and geographies to align critical elements, dominate their markets, and achieve dramatic results, such as 600% revenue increase in three years. Personally, he enjoys sailing where both his strategic abilities and tactical skills help him see interesting places while having a fabulous time with friends and family.
Contact him at: bob.legge@leggecompany.com.