Recognition and Thanks

Take the time to walk around this week and thank your people for the work they do, the ideas they surface, and the opportunities they discover. Make it a weekly habit.

I am grateful to all my clients present and past, to my mentors and associates, my family, my friends and everyone who has helped me to continually learn and my business to thrive. Have a happy Thanksgiving and holiday season.

“In ordinary life we hardly realize that we receive a great deal more than we give, and that it is only with gratitude that life becomes rich.” –Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Copyright 2017 Bob Legge
___________________________
Bob Legge has an unmatched ability to help clients achieve competitive advantage, leaving competitors in their dust. He has worked with companies across industries and geographies to align critical elements, dominate their markets, and achieve dramatic results, such as 600% revenue increase in three years. Personally, he enjoys sailing where both his strategic abilities and tactical skills help him see interesting places while having a fabulous time with friends and family.
Contact him at: bob.legge@leggecompany.com.

 

 

Leadership: Your Mileage May Vary

When working with clients on implementing strategy, accelerating change, or improving performance, the actual results they achieve can vary greatly. Some clients make good steady progress while others grab ahold and rocket forward with tremendous speed and growth. There are a number of factors involved, including (but not limited to) quality of leadership, skilled and experienced staff, honed processes, a strong business model and top-notch communications. But by far the number one determinant is the leader’s mindset.

Those leaders who focus on opportunity, expect high performance, and are ready to make changes are the ones who to see the best results. They build self-confidence in their organizations and challenge their people to accomplish great things. In these organizations, people usually tell me that they accomplished more than they thought they were capable of accomplishing.

Those who focus on difficulties, intractable problems, and ongoing barriers will realize much smaller gains. They look for short-fall and have low expectations. And their employees reflect that by approaching challenges as something to ‘try,’ but not to ‘get done.’

If you want to accelerate growth, you have to be thinking bigger, more positively, and demonstrate it in your leadership. People will mimic the tone, the mindset, and the attitude of the leader. And that predicts success.

Copyright 2017 Bob Legge
___________________________
Bob Legge has an unmatched ability to help clients achieve competitive advantage, leaving competitors in their dust. He has worked with companies across industries and geographies to align critical elements, dominate their markets, and achieve dramatic results, such as 600% revenue increase in three years. Personally, he enjoys sailing where both his strategic abilities and tactical skills help him see interesting places while having a fabulous time with friends and family.
Contact him at: bob.legge@leggecompany.com.

Making Relationships Productive

To be successful, managers and leaders need good relationships with their peers, subordinates and bosses. Yet, I usually see less-than-effective relationships when working with a leader. Often those relationships are allowed to continue, despite the personal and organizational costs.

Net Loss Relationships. The worst relationships are those where two people cause each other to be less productive. Blaming, miscommunicating, and defensiveness consumes energy of everyone around them. The longer the relationship continues, the more it costs the organization. As the manager, you cannot let these relationships coast – they will not get better on their own.

Breakeven Relationships. Sometimes productive and sometimes unproductive, these relationships are marked by people who cannot seem to develop effective ways to work together on a consistent basis. They are often cross-functional such as an engineering manager and a production manager, or a sales manager and a marketing manager. Together, the individuals do not add significantly to productivity, but their bosses tend to ‘live with it.’

Productive relationships. In these relationships, two people create more than they could do each one working independently. It’s rarely the case that the two agree on everything, but that is one of the reasons they are both creative in coming up with solutions, and productive in their work together. Usually, they share a common goal, and realize that to be successful, they have to depend on each other.

How are your relationships with your peers, direct reports, and boss? Which ones produce a net increase in productiveness, and which reduce productivity? What kind of relationships do you see in your overall organization, and in particular, among your direct reports? Do you have an approach and a plan to either make relationships productive or take other action? It’s important to act on them now – waiting will result in three possible outcomes; and two of them are costly.

Copyright 2017 Bob Legge
___________________________
Bob Legge has an unmatched ability to help clients achieve competitive advantage, leaving competitors in their dust. He has worked with companies across industries and geographies to align critical elements, dominate their markets, and achieve dramatic results, such as 600% revenue increase in three years. Personally, he enjoys sailing where both his strategic abilities and tactical skills help him see interesting places while having a fabulous time with friends and family.