What leaders can learn from Wells Fargo, Uber, and Weinstein

Corporate culture is in the news due to the likes of Wells Fargo, Uber, and the Harvey Weinstein Company. CEOs, through their own behavior, set the values and the standards of an organization. It generally matters very little what the CEO says in speeches or what values are posted in the lobby. What really matters is how the CEO acts, and how senior managers act.

Here’s a rule of thumb: If you want to understand the values of an organization, look at what it takes to get promoted.

Corporate culture is real. It has a powerful affect on people. You need to be concerned about how your corporate culture informs your employees’ behavior. A strong culture can be a source of competitive advantage. A weak culture usually causes problems.

What are you doing to build and reinforce a strong, positive culture in your business?

Copyright 2017 Bob Legge
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Bob Legge has an unmatched ability to help clients achieve competitive advantage, leaving competitors in their dust. He has worked with companies across industries and geographies to align critical elements, dominate their markets, and achieve dramatic results, such as 600% revenue increase in three years. Personally, he enjoys sailing where both his strategic abilities and tactical skills help him see interesting places while having a fabulous time with friends and family.
Contact him at: bob.legge@leggecompany.com.

Operating at the CEO Level

The CEO has the responsibility to think strategically about the company and its business. This is a two-fold challenge: The first part is to extricate yourself from day-to-day tactics, problems and tasks. This is often a difficult challenge for CEOs. The second part is to learn how to think strategically about your company. This includes its position in the market, what makes it distinctive, what the business must focus on, and equally as important, what it must not be doing.

This is what’s meant by ‘working on the business, instead of in the business.’

Many CEOs I’ve worked with find this a real challenge because they are used to solving problems, fire-fighting, and being the person with all the answers. But to be a CEO, you must stop doing those things and operate at the level of a CEO.

Are you fully operating at the level your position calls for? If not, what would it take for you to get there?

Copyright 2017 Bob Legge
___________________________
Bob Legge has an unmatched ability to help clients achieve competitive advantage, leaving competitors in their dust. He has worked with companies across industries and geographies to align critical elements, dominate their markets, and achieve dramatic results, such as 600% revenue increase in three years. Personally, he enjoys sailing where both his strategic abilities and tactical skills help him see interesting places while having a fabulous time with friends and family.
Contact him at: bob.legge@leggecompany.com.